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Work Doesn’t Have to Suck

Last week Chris Fields, blogger at Cost of Work and contributor to the PerformanceICreate site, wrote a post entitled Why Does Work Suck.

If you missed his post, Chris explained to us that employees have a lot of reasons resulting in their disengagement at work currently – thus, making work suck. Some of the reasons include:  job disatisfaction, glass ceilings, nepotism, favoritism, micro-management, and compensation.

Five moths ago, I could group myself into the disengaged group Chris spoke about in his post not too long ago. In fact, I wrote about how miserable I was in that job in a post on my personal blog site, XtremeHR, back in December. Now, the one thing to note with the prior two sentences is that they are past tense. I decided not to continue down a path where work sucked and neither do you.

I get everyone has some limitation that prevents them from moving on to bigger and better things; however, it’s these limitations we use as an excuse to keep from moving on to bigger and better things. Yes, I just said it – we make excuses.

Excuses? Yes!

I hear excuses why people cannot make a change all the time….I cannot relocate, no one will hire me based on the requirements they are asking for, I don’t feel like updating my resume, etc. At the end of the day, we can always find an excuse for not being able to get out of the situations we are in.

Why?

Because it is comfortable.

Reflect for a minute….how much easier is it for you to deal with the crap because you can perform the functions of the role without providing much thought and you don’t have to put work into updating your resume, networking, applying for positions, and eventually moving on?

It is pretty easy. And I get it, it is scary. However, you HAVE to do what is best for you by breaking through those fear barriers!

And this is exactly what I did last September. After four and a half years, I got fed up with being miserable, not utilizing my KSAs, not having fun, and living in a place where I really didn’t want to live. So, I applied for a position in Dallas, TX, with a different company, got the job, and moved myself from Memphis, TN, to Dallas, TX. The things I was unhappy about – the job, my boss, compensation, and the location in which I live – were all controllable by me. I took control and no longer would I allow work to suck!

Therefore, if you find yourself in a situation where the compensation stinks, your unhappy with your role, or you just don’t like where you live, you have three choices:

1. Continue to deal with your unhappiness; however, if you are not going to do anything about it you cannot complain

2. Address those issues that make you unhappy

  • If your pay sucks, ask for a raise
  • If your role isn’t what you want it to be, see if you can direct it to what you want it to be
  • Want a promotion? Discuss with your manager about succession planning or career progression

3. Make a decision to find something new that you will love and move on

There are opportunities out there for you, it just may require that you break out of your comfort zone and trying something new or move to a new location. If you find yourself in a situation where work sucks, let’s talk. I want you to enjoy work….it shouldn’t suck!

Photo Credit:

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